Data Dashboard

Welcome to the Tennessee Drug Overdose Dashboard The dashboards and data available through this application are the result of ongoing collaboration between the Tennessee Department of Health (TDH), Office of Informatics and Analytics and the Department of Finance & Administration, Division of Strategic Technology Solutions (STS). This interactive tool contains state, regional, and county level data on fatal overdoses, nonfatal overdoses and drug prescribing. http://tn.gov/health/topic/pdo-data-dashboard

Graphic Film, Discussion Aim to Open Conversation Between Parents, Teens About Opioid Abuse

Around 120 people, most of them parents of school-age children, listened somberly as the mother in the film relayed how her teenage daughter died of an overdose upstairs while she was downstairs cooking dinner. They cringed when a woman said she was so narrowly focused on getting high, she hadn't cared that an infected wound in her leg, caused by shooting up, had maggots in it, and didn't hesitate to mix toilet water from a public restroom with drugs and inject it. They gasped when a woman remembered injecting heroin into her jugular vein, dying, being brought back to life in the hospital and then leaving, still in her hospital gown, to buy more heroin from the same dealer and put it into he

TDMHSAS to Receive New Opioid Addiction Treatment Funding

NASHVILLE—The Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services (TDMHSAS) will receive six million dollars in federal funding to provide medication-assisted treatment for opioid addiction to people who otherwise might not have access to it. Treatment supported by the funding will be targeted to the uninsured or underinsured, particularly veterans or military members and women of childbearing age. In all, the funding will provide medication-assisted treatment for 660 people in six targeted counties: Davidson, Hardin, Lewis, Shelby, Sullivan, and Washington. “When battling opioid addiction, there’s no single treatment that can work for all patients,” said TDMHSAS Commissioner Marie Wil

Maryville Football Hears Reality of Drug Overdose from Former Player

Chris Murden of True Purpose Ministers puts a drug addiction awareness sticker on Maryville football players' helments Wednesday, Sept. 20, 2017. Cody McCoy, a former Maryville football player who graduated in 2009, spoke to the team about his brother Dane's death from drug overdose in May 2014. Maryville hosts the Red Ribbon Game to promote awareness of drug overdose. http://www.knoxnews.com/picture-gallery/sports/high-school/2017/09/20/maryville-football-hears-reality-of-drug-overdose-from-former-player/105833952/

Maryville Football Honors Former Player with Red Ribbon Game vs. Fulton

Cody McCoy stood in front of Maryville’s football team Wednesday and told them about a former Rebel, his brother Dane, and how he died of a drug overdose. He told them why Friday’s game against Fulton is the Red Ribbon Game. McCoy, a former Maryville football player who graduated in 2009, didn’t want his final memory of his brother to be from a funeral. So McCoy approached Maryville and they created the event. Each of the past two years Maryville has dedicated one game to drug addiction awareness in Dane’s memory. “The thing that tore me up just as much as his death was seeing what it did to my parents,” he said. “In trying to think of what I could do for them, to bring some light into their

Tennessee Medical Cannabis Task Force Hears Pushback, Support

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (WKRN) – The long debate about medical marijuana played out again Thursday on Tennessee’s Capitol Hill as skepticism was mixed with passionate support. It came at the first meeting of the task force appointed by the two legislative speakers to look into the issue. Medical Cannabis Task Force Chair Rep. Jeremy Faison minced no words in addressing law enforcement officials who have long been against legalizing marijuana for medical purposes. “Whether you are ready or not marijuana is coming to America,” said Faison referencing that more than half the states already have some form of medical cannabis. But medical cannabis coming to Tennessee depends on who you ask and it does n

Prescription Pills in your Car? Thieves May be Looking for Them

KNOXVILLE, Tenn. (WVLT) -- According to a recent police report, a car break-in downtown left one owner without his prescription medicine. Pharmacist and Medicine Shoppe owner Lisa Lawson says situations like this are common. "Any type of valuable in the car, they're going to steal it, and so prescription drugs right now are a valuable commodity," Lawson said. Police said the driving factor to steal the drugs, is more drugs. "People are out to find anything that they can use to exchange for drugs. The epidemic that's going on, not only in this community, but the country, is out of control," KPD Public Information Officer Darrell Debusk said. The trouble doesn't stop there. Lawson said it's cr

CVS Health Fighting National Opioid Abuse Epidemic with Enterprise Initiatives

WOONSOCKET, R.I. (AP) — CVS Health announced today that, as part of the company’s broad commitment to fighting the national opioid abuse epidemic, it is enhancing its enterprise-wide initiatives supporting safe drug disposal, utilization management of pain medications and funding for treatment and recovery programs. “As America’s front door to health care with a presence in nearly 10,000 communities across the country, we see firsthand the impact of the alarming and rapidly growing epidemic of opioid addiction and misuse,” said Larry J. Merlo, President and CEO, CVS Health. “Todawe are announcing an expansion of our enterprise initiatives to fight the opioid abuse epidemic that leverages CVS

East Tenn. School says Father can't Administer Hemp Oil to Son on School Grounds

James Griebe's son suffers involuntary twitching from a disorder called Tardive Dyskenisia. "It kills me to see him like this," he said. But he uses hemp oil to control it. "And it has absolutely almost corrected that," Griebe said, adding that small doses given three times a day allow his son to focus, especially at school. But his son's school district is barring him from taking the oil to class. "It makes me cry," Griebe said. "It's sad to see a kid twitch like that and not be able to do anything, and it's not his fault." School officials are waiting for an answer from the Campbell County District Attorney, who is looking into the legality of the drug. Until then, Griebe and his son must

42 Suspected Overdose Deaths in Knox County during August

KNOXVILLE - Knox County prosecutors estimate the county saw 42 suspected overdose deaths in August. It's the deadliest month so far this year. It puts the county at a total of 222 suspected deaths for the year, two less than in all of 2016. Thursday, August’s final day, marked International Overdose Day. Tennessee Overdose Prevention and other groups hosted an event at the Women's Basketball Hall of Fame in Knoxville. Former addicts, police, prosecutors and resource workers gathered to speak and offer help. Elliott Jenkins of Knoxville came honor loved ones she’s lost to overdoses. “It’s a different kind of death, a different kind of tragedy,” Jenkins said. Jenkins struggled with addiction f

Welcome to the Tennessee Drug Overdose Dashboard

he dashboards and data available through this application are the result of ongoing collaboration between the Tennessee Department of Health (TDH), Office of Informatics and Analytics and the Department of Finance & Administration, Division of Strategic Technology Solutions (STS). This interactive tool contains state, regional, and county level data on fatal overdoses, nonfatal overdoses and drug prescribing.

McNabb Center to Break Ground on 'Safety Center' Alternative to Jail for Mentally Ill

When the Tennessee Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services solicited proposals for its Pre-Arrest Diversion Infrastructure Projectearlier this year, Knox County's proposal scored highest in the state. The department cited the level of detail in the plan for Knox County's Behavioral Health Urgent Care Center — to be operated by the Helen Ross McNabb Center — and awarded Knox County more than $3.4 million to help it come about. Then again, planning for the "Safety Center," as it's more commonly known, began more than a decade ago. "We had a 10-year head start," said McNabb Center President and CEO Jerry Vagnier. A public "groundbreaking" Combined with funding from the county a

Knox Co. Schools Receive Overdose Reversal Drug

KNOXVILLE, Tenn. (WVLT) -- The Knox County School District is adding an eye opening lifeline to its list of resources, one that aims to keep students, parents and staff from flat-lining. "Our kids need help, and if we could reach out and help them all, like what we're trying to do with Naloxone, then we would," said John Smith, parent of a Knox County student. Smith said he welcomes the district's push to include Naloxone in every school. "I'm really happy that this is coming into our schools because we have people there who can save lives with it," said Smith. Within two weeks, schools will have two sets of Naloxone on hand, a nasal spray charged with reversing the effects of drug overdoses

Tennessee Overdose Deaths Jump 12% in 2016, as Opioid Crisis Rages

The number of Tennesseans who died from drug overdoses jumped 12 percent from 2015 to 2016, largely due to growing use of dangerous synthetic opioids. There were at least 1,631 Tennesseans who died in 2016 — up from 1,451 in 2015, according to new figures from the Tennessee Department of Health. However, the number of deaths is likely higher due to inconsistencies in how counties investigate and report deaths. Deaths from fentanyl, synthetic opioids, increased from 169 in 2015 to 294 in 2016, according to state data. Dr. John Dreyzehner, commissioner of the health department, said that while the rate of increase is slower than the previous year, the deaths represent "a horrible increase, and

Knox County Schools Approved for Grant to Put Overdose Antidote in Schools

Tennessee's attorney general is spearheading a coalition of 41 states that is demanding documents from several prescription painkiller manufacturers and distributors as it investigates the companies' practices regarding opioids. The states served subpoenas Tuesday on global pharmaceutical giants Endo International, Janssen, Allergan, and Teva, which bought Cephalon, as part of an investigation into whether the companies "engaged in unlawful practices in the marketing, sale, and distribution of opioids," according to a release from the state. “The opioid crisis impacts all of us, and is a threat to families in every community in Tennessee and across the country,” said Herbert Slatery, the sta

Tennessee, 40 Other States Demand Documents from Opioid Makers, Distributors

Tennessee's attorney general is spearheading a coalition of 41 states that is demanding documents from several prescription painkiller manufacturers and distributors as it investigates the companies' practices regarding opioids. The states served subpoenas Tuesday on global pharmaceutical giants Endo International, Janssen, Allergan, and Teva, which bought Cephalon, as part of an investigation into whether the companies "engaged in unlawful practices in the marketing, sale, and distribution of opioids," according to a release from the state. “The opioid crisis impacts all of us, and is a threat to families in every community in Tennessee and across the country,” said Herbert Slatery, the sta

School System to Hold Education Forums on Opioid Threat

Knox County Schools and WBIR are working together to present four public forums this fall to inform parents about the dangers of opioids. The first event will be Sept. 28 at Bearden High School. Similar events will follow Oct. 5 at South-Doyle High School, Oct. 25 at Fulton High School and Oct. 26 at Halls High School. Each event will be held 6-8 p.m. Numerous community groups and agencies are taking part including the Knox County Health Department, the Metro Drug Coalition, the Knoxville Police Department, the Knox County Sheriff's Office, the Knox County District Attorney General's Office and the district parent teacher association. The movie "Chasing the Dragon: The Life of an Opiate Addi

Increasing Number of Tennesseans Dying from Drug Overdoses

NASHVILLE – Tennessee Department of Health data show 1,631 Tennesseans died from drug overdoses in 2016, the highest annual number of such deaths recorded in state history. This is an increase from the 1,451 overdose deaths recorded among Tennessee residents in 2015. "Each of these numbers represents a person, with family and friends who are now facing the loss of someone dear to them to a cause that is preventable,” said TDH Commissioner John Dreyzehner, MD, MPH. “The rate of increase in these deaths is slower than in the previous year, but it is still a horrible increase, and as we feared, our data show illicit drugs like fentanyl are now driving the increase. “If this is a threat to any o

Tennessee Overdose Deaths Jump 12% in 2016, as Opioid crisis Rages

The number of Tennesseans who died from drug overdoses jumped 12 percent from 2015 to 2016, largely due to growing use of dangerous synthetic opioids. There were at least 1,631 Tennesseans who died in 2016 — up from 1,451 in 2015, according to new figures from the Tennessee Department of Health. However, the number of deaths is likely higher due to inconsistencies in how counties investigate and report deaths. Deaths from fentanyl, synthetic opioids, increased from 169 in 2015 to 294 in 2016, according to state data. Dr. John Dreyzehner, commissioner of the health department, said that while the rate of increase is slower than the previous year, the deaths represent "a horrible increase, and

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If they're still alive, there's hope.